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Posted on 13 November 2019

A deep dive into Aussie beer sizes

The question of whether you skol or scull a beer is one we have covered more than once. But how about getting the beer in the first place. Visitors to Australian shores are often flummoxed by the range of names we give our beer receptacles. And even more confusingly, these words refer to different sizes depending on whereabouts in Australia you end up. Let's take schooner as our base for now. In NSW, ACT, NT and Qld and parts of WA and Tasmania, this equates to a glass of beer of approximately 425mL. But if you end up in SA, a schooner is in fact a glass of beer of approximately 285mL. Confused yet? We're only just getting started. Asking for a schooner (at 285mL) in South Australia is equivalent to simply asking for a beer in Tasmania and the Northern Territory. While you're in the NT, you can also ask for a handle and receive the same thing. Still in the NT, you can also ask for a middy and still be understood to want the same thing. The great thing about the word middy is that it travels. You can take it to NSW, ACT, WA and some of Qld with no worries at all. In Victoria and parts of Queensland and Tasmania (two more multilingual beer states, like the NT), you will need to ask for a pot. And, again in Tasmania and Queensland, you can use the word ten to mean a glass of beer of approximately 285mL (or ten fluid ounces – more on this soon). But we're far from done. In beer terms, there is a slightly smaller version that is a glass of approximately 200ml. And if you're in Victoria, WA or Qld, asking for a beer will get you one of these. In SA, this size is known as a butcher. In WA, Victoria, Tasmania and Qld, a simple glass. And in NSW, ACT, Tasmania and Qld, the strangely named seven. It was called a seven as 200mL is also 7 fluid ounces, or a seven-ounce. But wait, we've gone from a ten or ten ounces to a seven. What about the numbers in between? Well, there is no nine, but a niner is a small keg of about 40.5 litres. And also no eight, but there is the phrase over the eight, which means 'intoxicated', and comes from an old-fashioned, customary worker's ration of ale for a day which was 8 pints (see below for what a pint means in beer speak!). In Tasmania, there was previously another measure of beer known as a six, which equated to, you guessed it, six fluid ounces or 170mL. And in Qld and some other places, there is the five, the meaning of which should be clear by now, also known as a pony. And that's where the numbered beers stop. So, it's much simpler to ask for a schooner, as it's almost universally understood. However, remember that in SA, if you want a schooner, or a 450mL glass of beer, you will need to ask for a pint. In NSW and the ACT, a pint is equivalent to one eighth of a gallon of beer, or around 568ml. This is the British measurement. But, in WA, Tasmania and SA, a pint is equivalent to around 473mL, which is the American measurement and is close enough to the schooner size of 425mL for it to have been conflated. After all that, we all need a beer! Good luck and bottoms up!
Posted on 8 October 2019

A quick look at the Macquarie Atlas of Indigenous Australia

The Macquarie Atlas of Indigenous Australia, Second Edition is a unique tool for exploring and understanding the lives and cultures of Australia's First Peoples. Combining the magic of maps with the latest data from the 2016 Australian Bureau of Statistics, the Atlas allows us to explore a visual history of Indigenous Australia.  About the contributors This second edition of the Macquarie Atlas of Indigenous Australia is a collabroative publication of the Australian National University, the Australian Bureau of Statistics and Macquarie Dictionary. General Editors Bill Arthur and Frances Morphy have been researching Indigenous affairs and working closely with Indigenous communities for several decades. In 2001 they began working on the first edition of the atlas, which took out the award of Overall Winner in the 2006 Australian Awards for Excellence in Educational Publishing (EEPA). In 2017, they began working on this second edition of the Atlas. Across both editions, there have been over 40 contributors who have researched, written and mapped the content in the Atlas under the general editorship of Bill and Frances. One of the primary aims for this second edition was to increase the presence of Indigenous people contributing to the project. These contributors are drawn from a wide variety of places and professions - from academia, the arts world, Indigenous organisations and the public service. A full list of chapter contributors is available here. About the cover art The cover art, titled Kungkarrangkalpa Tjurkurpa, is a collaborative painting made by Anawari Inpiti Mitchell, Angilyiya Tjapitji Mitchell, Lalla West, Jennifer Nginyaka Mitchell, Eileen Tjayanka Woods, Lesley Laidlaw and Robert Woods at the Papulankutja Artists group in the Northern Territory. The Seven Sisters Songline refers to the Pleiades constellation. It travels from the west to the east across the far western and central deserts. The sisters are pursued by a man, Yurla in the west and Wati Nyiru further east, who is a shapeshifter with transformative powers. He becomes particularly besotted with one of the sisters and pursues them endlessly in order to possess them. Today, this saga is visible in the Orion constellation and the Pleiades star cluster as a constant reminder of the consequences of attempting to possess something through wrongful means. Cover Art: "Kungkarrangkalpa Tjurkurpa", 2015, a collaborative painting made by Anawari Inpiti Mitchell, Angilyiya Tjapitji Mitchell, Lalla West, Jennifer Nginyaka Mitchell, Eileen Tjayanka Woods, Lesley Laidlaw and Robert Woods  About the maps There are several types of maps in the atlas. Among those featured are thematic maps which indicate the occurrence of phenomena across parts of the country, or an event or feature at particular locations and chloropleth maps which show the distribution of socio-economic data. Also featured are choropleth maps, maps with proportional symbols, column maps, as well as graphs, charts and illustrations. More information is available within the atlas itself. Earlier attempts to map Indigenous people at the national level include Norman Tinsdale's iconic map 'Tribal boundaries in Aboriginal Australia', based on research that had been carried out between 1930 and 1974. This map is discussed in detail within the book, but it was "significant in the genesis of the atlas." The version of the map used in the Atlas is an adaptation of Tindale's map. It includes "Indigenous group boundaries existing at the time of first European settlement in Australia, as far as they could be determined. It is not intended to represent contemporary relationships to land." Earlier examples of national mapping tended to deal with just single subjects. While acknowledging and drawing on them, this atlas surveys a comprehensive range of cultural, social and economic traits in a large set of national maps. Find out more The Macquarie Atlas of Indigenous Australia is available in hardback and as a fixed-layout ebook. This ebook is available as part of Apple's Volume Purchase program which allows educational institutions to purchase copies in volume and distribute to students and teachers for use in the classroom and at home. There is also a comprehensive Teacher's Guide available for free download.
Word of the Day
Posted on 20 November 2019

discomposure

The state of being discomposed; disorder; agitation; perturbation.