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There are 10 results of your search for pot


pot

a medium sized glass of beer (approx 285ml): A pot of Vic thanks barman. Compare butcher, glass, handle, middy1, middy2, pony, schooner1, schooner2, seven.


Contributor's comments: Same usage in Brisbane, however known as a middy in NSW.

Contributor's comments: [Brisbane informant] 10 oz. (285ml) glass of beer: "Two pots of light please."

Contributor's comments: [Brisbane informant] A pot is the smallest glass size (approx. 275ml) a beer comes in: "A pot of Fourex thanks mate."

Contributor's comments: A large glass of beer or ale, purchased in Victoria (385 ml - Victorian version of schooner): "I'll have 2 pots please, luv."

Contributor's comments: At one time a pot in some parts of NSW was 20oz. I recall ordering a pot in Byron Bay in the early '70s and getting a 20oz glass.

Contributor's comments: [Brisbane informant] The smallest glass is a "beer", medium is a "pot", and the biggie is a "schooner".

Contributor's comments: I have never lived in any part of Australia other than WA and I've never heard pot used in a pub in WA. It's always been a middy.

Contributor's comments: The only standard glass size for beer over the bar in Victoria, pints etc are a new addition.
butcher

noun a small glass of beer (approx. 200ml) served in SA. Compare glass, handle, middy1, middy2, pony, pot, schooner1, schooner2, seven. [German Becher drinking vessel]

Contributor's comments: I thought this refers to a 200 ml glass for a beer.

Contributor's comments: This is not really used in SA - more common in Vic I thought.

Contributor's comments: The background to this is that the butchers from the old East End Market used to drop in to the pub in their breaks, but they only had time for a small beer, hence a "butcher".

Contributor's comments: [Adelaide informant] Butcher has always been the name for a small glass of beer, smaller than a schooner, larger than a pony.

Contributor's comments: [Adelaide informant] A glass of beer smaller than a schooner: (on a pub crawl, to the bartender) "A butcher of sparkling thanks."
glass

A 7 fluid ounce glass of beer served in a Western Australian or Victorian hotel: Can I have a glass of Swan Lager please. Compare butcher, handle, middy1, middy2, pony, pot, schooner1, schooner2, seven.

Contributor's comments: In the Hunter Valley NSW, we ask for a "seven" of drink.

Contributor's comments: A 'glass' of beer in Melbourne, and I believe, generally in Victoria, referred to a 7 oz glass of beer, compared with the 5 oz 'pony' or the 10oz 'pot'. A 'schooner' which means a 20 oz glass in Sydney was not used in Melbourne. This usage refers to the '60's.

Contributor's comments: A schooner in Sydney is 15 oz (425 ml) and not 20 oz. A 20 oz glass is a "pint".
handle

a beer glass with a handle: Get me a handle. Compare butcher, glass, middy1, middy2, pony, pot, schooner1, schooner2, seven.


Contributor's comments: The term handle is used at traditional inner urban/city Melbourne pubs. Generally speaking, it is preferable not to drink from a 'handle' given the similarity to sipping a cup of tea (the handle on the side).

Contributor's comments: Came across the term "handle" at the Pine Creek Hotel about 250 km south of Darwin in 1984. However, I was never sure whether it was used to refer the glass in which beer was served (a 10 oz straight-sided type with a large handle) or to the use of the handle on the "tap" to dispense the beer. An order of a "handle" invariably worked at the bar whereas the use of any souther term (glass, pot, schooner) met with an affected blank stare. There was only beer available on tap for the handles - all other brands were served as opened stubbies or cans. Interestingly, on a return trip 5 years later, with the hotel then under new ownership, we found the term to be ineffective at the bar.

Contributor's comments: This term is also used in the south-west of WA
middy1

A medium sized glass of beer (approx 285ml) served in NSW; equivalent to a pot: A middy of New thanks barman. Compare butcher, glass, handle, middy2, pony, pot, schooner1, schooner2, seven. [so called because it is midway between a glass and a schooner]

middy2

a small glass of beer (approx. 200ml) served in WA; equivalent to a pony. Compare butcher, glass, handle, middy1, pony, pot, schooner1, schooner2, seven. [so called because it is midway between a glass and a pot]


pony

small glass of beer, usually for women (approx. 140ml): Would you like a pony? Compare butcher, glass, handle, middy1, middy2, pot, schooner1, schooner2, seven.

Contributor's comments: 40-50 years ago it was used in Victoria for a 5oz glass of beer.

Contributor's comments: "Pony" was also used in WA. It was the smallest glass of beer available in the pub. I don't think it is still served.

Contributor's comments: I haven't seen one on a while but the word was also used in WA to mean a beer glass of about 140ml.

Contributor's comments: Pony glasses of beer are still served at the horse-racing tracks of Perth and they are still small.

Contributor's comments: I recall my grandfather drank the occasional pony (7oz) and my grandmother a "ladies waist" (5oz).

Contributor's comments: The term pony is used by my age group (born 1970-1980) to describe the NSW 'middy' size beer glass for the Riverina region of SW NSW region.

Contributor's comments: There is also a Spiderbait song (from Finley originally) called "Buy Me a Pony" as a reference to cheap pepole in the music industry. A pony being the smallest cheapest drink a record company type guy can buy for a young artist.
schooner1

A large glass of beer (approx 385ml) served in NSW: A schooner of Reschs thanks barman. Compare butcher, glass, handle, middy1, middy2, pony, pot, schooner2, seven.

Contributor's comments: Standard Size Glass in Adelaide (see pot in Qld, and VIC)

Contributor's comments: a schooner refers to a 285 ml beer glass in South Australia.

Contributor's comments: I would truly be surprised if ANY true Qld'er ever uses this term - it really is a NSW name as far as I am aware.
schooner2

A glass of beer (approx. 285ml) served in SA; equivalent to a pot: A schooner of Coopers thanks barman. Compare butcher, glass, handle, middy1, middy2, pony, pot, schooner1, seven.

Contributor's comments: Standard Size Glass in Adelaide (see pot in Qld, and Vic).

Contributor's comments: A schooner refers to a 285 ml beer glass in South Australia.

Contributor's comments: [Adelaide informant] 285 ml beer glass: "Could I please have a schooner of beer?"
seven

A seven fluid ounce glass of beer served in a NSW hotel: Can I have a seven of Old Kent Brown please. Compare butcher, glass, handle, middy1, middy2, pony, pot, schooner1, schooner2.

Contributor's comments: In the Hunter Valley NSW, we ask for a "seven" of drink.