Back to regionalism list

There are 5 results of your search for circlework


circlework

the act of driving a car in tight circles at full throttle, causing the rear wheels to skid, and when done on the ideal dusty site, cause something of a dust storm: let's go and do some circlework. Compare doughnut, doughies, hoops, two-bob.

Contributor's comments: [NSW informant] The activity described is also know as "doughnuts".

Contributor's comments: Circlework is definately a recognised term throughout Brisbane.


Contributor's comments: [Perth informant] To do doughies, especially in a ute: "Me and Damo did some circle work on the oval last night."

Contributor's comments: Also widely used in Tasmania.

Contributor's comments: To drive a car (usually a ute) around in circles on a lawn to make impressive dents in the grass: "Did you see Gibbsy and Jacko out doin' circle work on the oval last night? The coach will be spewin'!"


Contributor's comments: Young men also used to 'dump sets' which is a straight line a tyre marks on a suburban road.
doughies

To drive a car in tight circles at full speed causing the rear wheels to lose traction and raise a lot of smoke/dust: Let's take the Gemini out and do a few doughies. Compare circlework, doughnut, hoops, two-bob.

Contributor's comments: An abbreviation of "doughnuts", refers to the shape of the tyre marks made, also used in WA.

Contributor's comments: [NSW Informant] We called doughies 'doughnuts'. A straight-line version of this was always called 'laying down rubber' or a 'burnout'.

Contributor's comments: "Doughies" is also used in Melbourne.

doughnut

a roughly circular track left from the tyres of a vehicle when floored on full lock. Compare circlework, doughies, hoops, two-bob.

Contributor's comments: Refers to the shape of the tyre marks made, also used in WA.

Contributor's comments: [NSW Informant] We called doughies 'doughnuts'. A straight-line version of this was always called 'laying down rubber' or a 'burnout'.



Contributor's comments: [Perth informant] In the 50s and early 60s, we called this a "two-bob" -- "He's cutting a two-bob in the gravel". Metrics must have killed this off!

Contributor's comments: [Melbourne informant] The other day I friend said to me 'your giving me doughnuts' meaning that I was not giving him anything. The logic behind this slang is that doughnuts are round and often have a hole in them. Thus they look like a zero and that is what I was giving him, zero or nothing.

Contributor's comments: [Tasmanian informant] To speed in a car in very tight circles, usually creating tyre marks on the road surface. This produces immense satisfaction and happiness to the creator: "Cor, let's do some doughnuts, Shazza!"

Contributor's comments: This may not be a regionalism. I've heard this word used in this way on The Simpsons.

Contributor's comments: To make your car/bike spin its wheels in a tight 360 degrees leaving a circle on the road: "The Hoons were chucking donuts in the car park."
hoops

another term for circlework (driving a car in tight circles at full throttle, causing the rear wheels to skid): Let's get the ute fired up & go do some hoops. Compare circlework, doughnut, doughies, two-bob.

Contributor's comments: Known in SEQ as doughnuts, for obvious reasons.

Contributor's comments: Cuttin' Hoops: Act of driving in tight circles in a car (generally a ute) so that the car pivots on it's front whilst the back end continues on a circle. Also called doing Donuts. Generally used by rural teenagers: "I've been cuttin' hoops in my ute."
two-bob

a roughly circular track left from the tyres of a vehicle when floored on full lock. Compare circlework, doughnut, doughies, hoops.

Contributor's comments: [Perth informant] In the 50s and early 60s, we called [a doughnut] a "two-bob" -- "He's cutting a two-bob in the gravel". Metrics must have killed this off!