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There are 5 results of your search for case


case1

port in other areas. eg school case: The case is too full to shut properly. Compare port.
case2

24 pack of stubbies/cans of beer - same as a slab: I'm off to the bottle shop to buy a case of beer. Compare block2, box, carton, slab.


Contributor's comments: [Wollongong informant] What a 24 pack of cans/bottles comes in. 'South of the border' (and commonly close to the border), being VIC, it is referred to as a slab.
box

a carton of beer: Could I have a box of green cans please. Compare block2, carton, case2, slab.
carton

a cardboard case of 24 cans/bottles of beer. Compare block2, box, case2, slab.

Contributor's comments: Also used in Tasmania.

Contributor's comments: The term "carton" is widely used in Western Australia.

Contributor's comments: [Brisbane informant] Box of beer - slab, case, etc.: "Can you grab a carton when you're at the bottle-o?"

Contributor's comments: [Wollongong informant] What a 24 pack of cans/bottles comes in. 'South of the border' (and commonly close to the border), being VIC, it is referred to as a slab.

Contributor's comments: This is the common terminology for a carton (24 cans/stubbies, etc) of beer in WA too.

Contributor's comments: We have always purchased a carton of beer. I found that more southern areas of NSW seem to buy a case of beer.

Contributor's comments: Carton is used extensively in Sydney. Case is also used, but less often. Certainly in all of the advertisements here, it is "carton".

Contributor's comments: In Queensland it's a carton, although a friend who grew up in Vic still calls it a slab.

Contributor's comments: Down here [Melbourne, Vic] its always been a slab from the bottle-o and a carton of smokes..
slab

24 pack of stubbies or cans of beer: He bought a slab for the bbq. Compare block2, box, carton, case2.


Contributor's comments: Also used in Tasmania.

Contributor's comments: Funny thing is slab was never used in WA until recently. I had never heard anyone say the word 'slab' until I was in my mid 20's. 'Carton' has always been the name for beer that comes pre-packed in a box in WA. Slab seems to have crept it's way in as a word in the last 10 years.

Contributor's comments: Grew up in Perth and have never ever heard this word used to describe a 'carton' in Perth. It is however used all the time in Melbourne where I now live.

Contributor's comments: A slab of beer contains 30 cans, a carton contains 24.

Contributor's comments: I've heard slab used in Vic: and it is in constant use in the Army.

Contributor's comments: 'Slab' is NOT a West Australian term. The word for a 24 can box of beer is a 'carton', a 30 can box of beer is a 'block'.


Contributor's comments: A slab is sometimes referring to a mullet hair style, as in that fella has a huge slab.

Contributor's comments: Widely used in Tasmania also.

Contributor's comments: Is also used in Queensland occasionally.

Contributor's comments: To my ear, slab is relatively recent in WA - we used to call it a carton of stubbies and still do in my circles.

Contributor's comments: I first heard this word in Victoria. Everyone I know in Vic still uses this term. I have heard it very rarely in NSW.

Contributor's comments: This term is also used in Brisbane, especially for cans of beer.

Contributor's comments: This word has common usage in South Australia for same meaning.

Contributor's comments: Used in the Darwin region as well.

Contributor's comments: the term 'SLAB' is more commonly used for beer in VICTORIA than NSW where it is most often called a 'case' a USA term.

Contributor's comments: Moving from NSW to Tassie to Victoria then back to NSW, I've found slab to be far more prevalent in Tassie and Victoria. I think it originally referred specifically to Carlton United Brewery products which would be four six-packs of aluminium cans placed on a sheet of cardboard then shrinkwrapped in plastic. These days I think it generally refers to any carton of stubbies or cans.

Contributor's comments: Down here [Melbourne, Vic] its always been a slab from the bottle-o and a carton of smokes.

Contributor's comments: I came across an interesting use of the term in northern SA: distances were sometimes measured in slabs eg two people going from Birdsville to Marree would be around one and a half slabs, that's how many beers they would drink over such a distance.