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by jingo

noun a frozen flavoured confection on a stick.: Who wants a bigingo? Compare iceblock, icy pole, paddle-pop. Also, bi jingo, bye jingo, bigingo.

Contributor's comments: In Townsville during the 60's and 70's we'd wait to hear the bell of the bi-jingo man's van. He'd drive around the streets in summer. He would happily sell a single bi-jingo, you didn't have to buy packets. My favourite was pink lemonade.

Contributor's comments: I grew up in Townsville in Nth QLD and still live here. Bigingo was definitely an iceblock when I was a kid. Sometimes when talking about the past with workmates I mention this term and they are amazed by it.

Contributor's comments: Was born in Townsville. Definitely iceblock on a stick. Alternative spelling byjingo.

Contributor's comments: I lived in Townsville in 1970's and yes byjingos was the name we used for ice blocks. Possibly what I have heard southerners call icy poles. I don't remember the byjingo man doing the rounds of the streets, but I do remember the Mr Whippy man driving the streets in the 1960's when I lived in Mackay. Of course the Mr Whippy Man has now been superceded by the Home Icecream Man ... thanks to franchising.

Contributor's comments: (noun) an ice confectionary on a stick. Sometimes known as a paddlepop. Used until about 1980, then the migration of southern people to the north led to the use of the word losing favour: "A bijingo an a hot day is very refreshing, but you have to be carefull not to let it melt before you can eat it."

Contributor's comments: A bye jingo is an ice block or popsicle. I believe that it was actually the brand name of one of the first ice blocks released. It can also be used as an exclamation: "Can you buy me a bye jingo Mum?" OR "Bye jingos he was big!"


Contributor's comments: I grew up in Ayr N.Q. in the 60s and remember bi jingo as being a water based flavoured ice block. I believed that it was a term peculiar to N.Q. but have just discussed this with my husband who grew up in Brisbane at the same time and he recalls waiting for the icecream man to come to buy a bi jingo - either orange or lemonade flavoured.

Contributor's comments: This was a word we commonly used growing up in Bowen, NQ in the late 70's and early 80's. We would go for a swim at the beach in our togs and then dad would buy us a by jingo. I now reside in the NT and no one has ever heard of this word. I can remember being told that the origin of the word came from the brand name of a NZ ice block, so I have no idea how it came to be a term used by North Queenslanders!

Contributor's comments: We used this word quite a lot and still do and have heard it as far north as Cairns.

Contributor's comments: "by jingo" was used for an ice block on a stick in Townsville in the 60's. I have a feeling that it was distributed by Peters Icecream and the advertising had a catch phrase ,"by jingo, that's good".

Contributor's comments: I grew up in Ayr N.Q. in the 60s and remember bi jingo as being a water based flavoured ice block. I believed that it was a term peculiar to N.Q. but have just discussed this with my husband who grew up in Brisbane at the same time and he recalls waiting for theicecream man to cometo by a bi jingo - either orange or lemonade flavoured.
iceblock1

noun a frozen flavoured confection on a stick. Compare by jingo, icy pole, paddle-pop.

Contributor's comments: Small cube of frozen flavoured water. Sold in square cups similar to icecream cones. Popular around Fremantle in the 50s. Forerunner to icy-poles. The last one I bought cost tuppence: "It was hot so we bought the kids ice blocks to cool them down."
icy pole

noun a frozen flavoured confection on a stick. Compare by jingo, iceblock, paddle-pop. [trademark]


Contributor's comments: I disagree that "icy pole" is commonly used in Sydney to describe a water-based frozen confection on a stick (your map indicates usage across NSW). These confections are called "ice blocks" in Sydney. When living in Melbourne, I was advised that a request for an "ice block" might get you exactly that - a block of frozen water.

Contributor's comments: In Victoria in the 1950s, an "ice block" was a homemade square version of the commercial "icy pole".

Contributor's comments: Usually cheapest frozen confection (held by the integral "icy pole stick") in the corner store/shop. Common flavours being Lemonade or Rasberry (NW Victoria).

Contributor's comments: Growing up in the S.W. Riverina in the 1950s-60s, this was the only term I remember, though I recall visiting kids from other areas calling them paddle pops.

Contributor's comments: Growing up in the Armidale area in the 50s/60s, we always referred to the ice block on a stick as an icy pole.

Contributor's comments: I grew up in Perth in the 1950's 60's and Peters Ice Cream used to bring out an "Icy Pole" sold in corner shops and Theatre shops. They came in various flavors.

Contributor's comments: When I was a kid in Melbourne in the 50s and 60s, 'icy pole' was the only expression we used for a confection on a stick. People still use it here today.
paddle-pop

noun a frozen flavoured confection on a stick. Compare by jingo, iceblock, icy pole. [trademark]

Contributor's comments: An icy pole/iceblock is a water-based ice confection on a stick, whilst a paddle-pop is a dairy-based ice confection on a stick. Similar - but definitely different products. Icy pole is used in Victoria (a brand name) and iceblock is used in NSW, but paddle-pop is used in both states.

Contributor's comments: I've heard paddle-pop used a lot in Perth as well. However, besides referring to the actual ice-cream brand, I'm not sure if it is used to refer to a similar ice-cream of a different brand.


Contributor's comments: We definitely use paddle-pop here (for at least the last 30 years), but I think it always means the paddle-pop brand. If it's a different brand, then it gets called ice-cream or ice-block.