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bungalow1

noun a small self-contained dwelling in the grounds of a house: *My lodgings - a self-contained bungalow behind the house of a silent elderly couple. --GERALD MURNANE, 1987. Compare bungalow2, granny flat.
Contributor's comments: I've seen this used often enough in Sydney real estate ads.

Contributor's comments: The comment that "bungalow" is used in Sydney real estate advertisements is correct - but it is used to describe a house, usually with a verandah [see other entry for 'bungalow'], not the Victorian "bungalow" which would probably be called a "granny flat" in Sydney.

Contributor's comments: Is this really a regionalism? I currently live in NYC, where it's used just as frequently as it is in Melbourne, and it was used on the Goon Show (Henry and Minnie live in a bungalow), which indicates that UK listeners were expected to be familiar with it.

Editor's comments: Yes, this is a regionalism because although the word 'bungalow' is used around the world, it has slightly different meanings in different places. In Australia there are at least two regionally-restricted meanings - see above and other entry for 'bungalow'. (In the UK it refers to a single-storey house, as opposed to the normal two storeys).
bungalow2

noun a small house or cottage of one storey. Compare bungalow1, granny flat.
Contributor's comments: I've seen this used often enough in Sydney real estate ads.

Contributor's comments: The comment that "bungalow" is used in Sydney real estate advertisements is correct - but it is used to describe a house, usually with a verandah, not the Victorian "bungalow" which would probably be called a "granny flat" in Sydney [see other entry for 'bungalow'].

Contributor's comments: Is this really a regionalism? I currently live in NYC, where it's used just as frequently as it is in Melbourne, and it was used on the Goon Show (Henry and Minnie live in a bungalow), which indicates that UK listeners were expected to be familiar with it.

Editor's comments: Yes, this is a regionalism because although the word 'bungalow' is used around the world, it has slightly different meanings in different places. In Australia there are at least two regionally-restricted meanings - see above and the other entry for 'bungalow'. (In the UK it refers to a single-storey house, as opposed to the normal two storeys).
granny flat

A separate, often partially self-contained, dwelling at the rear or a house - designed to accommodate elderly relatives or older children. Would be called a "bungalow" in Melbourne/Victoria. Planning laws in NSW allowed such dwellings to be constructed in the days before dual occupancy was permitted, to allow people to look after elderly relatives: Just whip up the side of the house and you will find Ma happy-as-Larry out the back in her granny flat. Compare bungalow.

Contributor's comments: Granny flat is also used in S.A.

Contributor's comments: I only heard the term "chalet" when living in Hobart. On the North West Coast where I grew up, we referred to them as Granny Flats.

Contributor's comments: Granny flat is also used in Melbourne.

Contributor's comments: I have also heard them referred to as sleepouts, or in the northern suburbs of Hobart where I live they were often "Wog Flats" after the new Australian immigrants who often built a self-contained shed that was then attatched (or not) later to the house. I have a prime example in my backyard... They are still used as a "sideline" rental though I don't know how legitimate they are.

Contributor's comments: Grew up in Hobart, and in fact had a granny flat in my backyard.