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#1 Good blokes & great guys

Nov 02, 2016

Welcome to the very first episode of Word for Word, a podcast about words and language from Macquarie Dictionary.

It's the dictionary's job to record every aspect of Australian English, warts and all, and to keep up with changes in the language. But sometimes change can land the dictionary in a world of controversy... Also: how do you tell the difference between a great guy and a good bloke?

Subscribe now on iTunes or your favourite podcast app to get each episode delivered direct to your device.

Favourite words

Thanks to the Women’s Dunbar Rovers Football Club for their favourite words: soccer, football, mechanism, soliloquy, mystic, howzitgoin', bulk, chat

Additional Links

Read more about the topics discussed in this episode...

On the blog:

Why is the word 'youse' in the dictionary?
Literally screaming with excitement
A letter from The Editor on 'misogyny'
What are Explantory Notes (and why are they important)?

In the news:

Why 'youse' deserves its place in the Australia's national dictionary | The Guardian
A timely word from the wise Susan Butler | The Australian
MI·SOG·Y·NY. Hijacked by pedants | The Hoopla


Acknowledgements

Word for Word is produced by Kate Sherington for Macquarie Dictionary and Pan Macmillan Australia. Thanks are due to Sue Butler, Victoria Morgan, Melissa Kemble, Adrik Kemp and the whole team at Macquarie. Thanks also to the Women’s Dunbar Rovers Football Club for their favourite words. 

Music used in this episode is by Broke For Free, available from the Free Music Archive and used by permission of the artist: The Gold LiningIf. Find more music by Broke for Free. All sound effects are public domain or via Soundsnap, with the exception of the Bush sound effects from Kangaroo Vindaloo (ref 147538) licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution Licence.

Misogyny speech used by permission of the Australian Parliamentary Library.

Our logo is by Amy Sherington.


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